PARIS

MACHINES FOR LIVING: LE CORBUSIER IN PARIS

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Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, the Swiss architect better known by his pseudonym Le Corbusier, was one of the pioneers of architectural modernism. His use of industrial techniques and materials such as steel, concrete and plate glass helped set the pattern for the modern style and profoundly influenced many post-war reconstruction and urban renewal projects undertaken in Europe. At the origin of the famous thesis according to which "the house is a machine for living", Le Corbusier worked extensively in Paris and obtained French nationality in 1930. He is also today both praised and criticized as the one of the ancestors of the modern tower.

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Ozenfant House

This house, built for Le Corbusier's friend, the painter Amédée Ozenfant, at 53 avenue Reille in the 14th arrondissement, is Le Corbusier's first work in Paris.

This house-workshop is one of the first purist works of Le Corbusier, like the villas La Roche and Jeanneret .

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The Swiss Pavilion , located in the Cité Universitaire in the south of Paris, is part of a large campus of university residences which welcomes students and teachers from all over the world.

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The Swiss Pavilion , located in the Cité Universitaire. The residential pavilions of Cité U, as it is called, were staffed from the 1920s by various governments around the world, initially to accommodate their foreign students.

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Planeix House

This terraced house in the 13th arrondissement of Paris was built in 1928 for a sculptor of funeral monuments.

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Maison Planeix is an artist's villa-studio located at numbers 24 bis to 26 bis of boulevard Masséna, in the 13th arrondissement of Paris. It was built between 1925 and 1928 by Le Corbusier and his cousin Pierre Jeanneret for the funerary sculptor and painter Antonin Planeix.The Planeix house is an artist's villa-studio located at numbers 24 bis to 26 bis of boulevard Masséna, in the 13th arrondissement. from Paris. It was built between 1925 and 1928 by Le Corbusier and his cousin Pierre Jeanneret for the funerary sculptor and painter Antonin Planeix.

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The Maison du Brésil at the Cité Universitaire was initially commissioned from the Brazilian architect Lucio Costa, who asked Le Corbusier to help him with the design.

 

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Villa Laroche and Jeanneret

This house located in the 16th arrondissement of Paris is today the headquarters of the Le Corbusier Foundation.

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Villa Laroche and Jeanneret

This house located in the 16th arrondissement of Paris is today the headquarters of the Le Corbusier Foundation.

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The Cité de Refuge was started by the Salvation Army in 1929 and, after many difficulties overcome, was inaugurated on December 7, 1933.

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Molitor building

Le Corbusier took an apartment for himself at the top of this glass-fronted building, completed in 1934.

After a two-year restoration, the studio apartment where Le Corbusier lived from 1934 to 1965 with his wife Yvonne Gallis reopens its doors to the public.

This duplex, located on the 7th and 8th floors of the Molitor building, designed and built between 1931 and 1934 by Le Corbusier with his cousin Pierre Jeanneret, was also his painting studio and a manifesto of his architectural thought.